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Be Eco with Rite in the Rain

4 Apr

Rite in the Rain on EuropeanPaper.comRite in the Rain, a company focused on creating “outdoor writing products for outdoor writing people,” was founded in the 1920’s by Jerry L. Darling. Designed to address the needs of logging industry workers in the Pacific Northwest, the new paper technology Darling invented soon became popular for outdoor professionals and enthusiasts around the United States. The water-based coating technology of Rite in the Rain paper makes writing possible in the most drastic of weather conditions: rain, snow, sleet, extreme humidity … even underwater! The ultra-durable protective notebooks have found a home in the hands of mountaineers, river guides, military personnel, outdoor research scientists, boy scouts, world travelers, and weekend warriors (just to name a few).

In the early days, Rite in the Rain’s paper coating process was done by hand in Tacoma,Washington. J.L. Darling would spend the early morning dipping paper in a secret solution, and leave it hanging from a hook while he went fishing for the day. After the paper had dried, J.L. would make a diagonal cut in the opposite corner of the hook where the solution had built up. This created the hole-punch and diagonal corner that made early Rite in the Rain paper identifiable. When enough paper was finished, J.L.’s wife Mary would gather it together and hand-sew a binding to complete the notebook. By the time the Silver family took over Rite in the Rain in the late 1950’s, the process had become much more efficient. The distinct markings on the paper faded with the emergence of better technologies, but the focus on hand-made quality and a love for the outdoors would always remain.

Rite in the Rain Pocket Soft Cover Universal Notebook (3.5 x 5) (Set of 3)

Rite in the Rain Pocket Soft Cover Universal Notebook in new colors!

Current owners Todd and Scott Silver were brought on board in 1994, but grew up with Rite in the Rain. Their dad, Lloyd Silver was the third employee of the J.L. Darling Company. As outdoors enthusiasts with backgrounds in environmental science, the Silver brothers are dedicated to running an environmentally sustainable business, which is reflected by the incredibly efficient manufacturing processes at Rite in the Rain that include:

  • The proprietary coating that makes RITR’s paper so special is made from water, not oil, and emits steam instead of harmful greenhouse gases.
  • Printing is done with 100% soy-based inks. Vegetable-based inks such as soy have proved to be more sustainable than petroleum-based inks because they require less energy during the agricultural process and are easier to remove during paper recycling. You can read more about vegetable-based inks in our eco-glossary.
  • Even with their waterproof coating, Rite in the Rain’s paper is completely recyclable just like standard office paper.
  • Notebook covers are made from post-consumer plastics such as milk and shampoo bottles.
  • Mill cut-offs are recycled back into the paper manufacturing process.
  • All printing plates and processing liquids are recycled after use.
  • Use of only FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified sustainable paper resources.

Everything is designed with the environment in mind, which pays compliment to the integrity of a company whose products stem from a love and respect for the outdoors.

Rite in the Rain Extra Large Side Spiral Bound Notebook (8.5 x 11)

Rite in the Rain Extra Large Side Spiral Bound Notebook

Rite in the Rain’s one-of-a-kind notebooks come in a multitude of sizes, bindings, and page layouts, making them a versatile all-weather notebook for outdoor professionals and enthusiasts alike. The notebooks come in soft or hard cover, with sizes from Pocket (3.5 x 5 inches) to Extra-Large (8.5 x 11 inches), and vary between spiral, hard, and perfect bound covers. The page styling offers three different formats: universal, ruled, or plain, to suit your occupational needs or personal preference. The notebooks also come with a space to fill in personal information in case of loss. This includes the name and description of your project and a blank table of contents that will aid in organizing your research or sketches. The waterproof cover and pages mean no tearing, smudging, or bleeding. Dive into any adventure with Rite in the Rain and never worry about losing another idea.

The Legends of Moleskine & LEGO Unite

28 Mar

Moleskine LEGO Notebooks on EuropeanPaper.com

Many Moleskine and LEGO fans let out a sigh of relief  and muttered online “Finally!” when the new Moleskine LEGO Limited Edition Notebook series came out. But why are they saying that now? Moleskine has collaborated with the likes of Star Wars, Pac-Man, Le Petit Prince, among others. Surely LEGO fits in with those grandmasters? Well, they do, but they also stand apart slightly. LEGO inextricably aligns with Moleskine’s well-known mantra of the customer’s constantly evolving creative personal identity (while the others mentioned already have their stories established). It really is a match made in heaven to have Moleskine and LEGO – two incredibly creative brands with strong histories – come together in this new series of notebooks where you can “Think With Your Hands.”

And did you know? LEGO is a contraction of the Danish words “leg” and “godt,” which means “play well” in Danish. Coincidentally, the word LEGO in Latin loosely translates to “I study” and “I put together.” LEGO began with humble beginnings in 1916 in Denmark in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen. After a fire consumed the workshop in 1924, Christiansen rebuilt and began constructing wooden toys in 1932, only moving to plastic in 1947 after purchasing a plastic injection molding machine.

LEGO’s plastic bricks really took hold in the 1960’s and soon LEGO was experiencing exponential growth in multiple markets. Today, LEGO produces a massive amount of blocks, as evidenced in this neat fact: “Every year, about 19 billion LEGO bricks are produced. That translates to 2.16 million LEGO elements are molded every hour, or 36,000 per minute! The LEGO manufacturing process is so precise that only 18 out of 1 million LEGO bricks produced is considered defective.” (10 Neatest LEGO Facts.)

LEGO has continued to evolve over time, and still has a strong hold on the toy market today. Combined with the strong evocations of Moleskine notebooks, this is an instant classic not to be missed. Like the Moleskine Classic Journals, Moleskine LEGO Notebooks have a sewn binding, acid-free paper, rounded edges, elastic closure, cloth ribbon placeholder, and a rear expandable inner pocket. All the Moleskine features you’ve come to know and love, bound together with the excitement of LEGO.

Moleskine LEGO Pocket Ruled Notebook (3.5 x 5.5)

The legends of Moleskine and LEGO finally meet in this instant notebook classic. The Moleskine LEGO Pocket Ruled Notebook combines two of the most iconic creative mediums to encourage the potential of unlimited thought. The themed black cover is debossed with a yellow LEGO screenprint and the real yellow LEGO brick embedded in the cover is perfect for any Lego enthusiast. Arrange your words, sketches, and thoughts to construct a world of your own in this pocket-sized notebook for free expression. Let your ideas flow on all 192 lined pages (96 leaves) while using the yellow cloth ribbon placeholder and themed adhesive labels to stay organized. Look to the inside cover and be inspired through the colorfully designed axiom “Think With Your Hands”.

Moleskine LEGO Pocket Ruled Notebook available on EuropeanPaper.com

Moleskine LEGO Large Ruled Notebook (5 x 8.25)

The Moleskine LEGO Large Ruled Notebook is perfect for a traditional Moleskine aficionado. The themed black cover, debossed with a black LEGO screenprint and embedded with a real black LEGO brick, along with the original cloth ribbon placeholder make for a characteristic Moleskine notebook. Arrange your words, sketches, and thoughts to construct a world of your own in all 240 lined pages (120 leaves) of this large-sized notebook. The combination of two iconic creative mediums encourages the potential of unlimited thought, as emphasized by the colorfully designed axiom “Think With Your Hands” on the inside cover. This notebook is sure to be an instant classic in any Moleskine collection.

Moleskine Lego Large Ruled Notebook (5 x 8.25)

Moleskine LEGO Large Ruled Notebook available on EuropeanPaper.com

Friday Blogger Tuck-ins

23 Mar

1 –>  Our Moleskine Haiku Contest winner Sandra is still doling out the love with a wonderful review of the Moleskine Passions Wine Journal!

2 –> Gourmet Pens: Call for Submissions for the April Carnival of Pen & Paper

3 –> Journal Addict: Meet Journal Keeper Lynn Fisher …This sums it up quite nicely, but you still should click over to read it all! “I have now amassed what most people would regard as a fire hazard of journals in a variety of sizes, shapes, handmade, or store-bought. All reflect the joy and heartache of the examined life in a way that most precisely mirrors what and who I am as a person right now.”

4 –> Letter Writers Alliance: Cherry Blossom Centennial Stamp Release and Party

5 –> Writing Instruments: Writing Instruments are the Voice of Desire

6 –> Missive Maven: A letter to a favorite writer, hand-delivered

7 –> R Scribbling Glue: That’s Not a Tea Cup, It’s a Post Office Box!

8 –> Rhodia Drive: Creative Prompt: Your Favorite Things

9 –> Plannerisms: Preparing for the Planner Drought


10 Ideas for a Journaling Jump Start

8 Mar

Today, journals come in so many designs, materials, and sizes that there is something for everyone. Once you’ve found the one for you, however, you might find yourself with pen or pencil in hand, staring at the blank pages and thinking … now what? What do I write?

It’s happened to everyone at some point whether in personal or professional cases. That’s where we come in to help. Need inspiration of where to start? Use these ideas to jumpstart your pen across those white and empty pages:

  1. Count Your Blessings: Too often we let the things we are most grateful for slip by without being fully appreciated. Start writing down three things you’re grateful for each day. It will help you to not only take note of these moments in life, but to actually watch for them and give them the attention they deserve.
  2. Make Lists: While grocery lists are rarely exciting enough to merit a place in your journal, keep lists of everything from what musicals you saw this year to what fishing lures you like best to what tricks you want to learn on your snowboard. Each list can inspire you to develop the items more.
  3. Set Goals: Writing down goals is considered the most important step to actually accomplishing them. Whether you start small and write down what you want to achieve today or this week, or if you go big and write down what you want to achieve this year or in your lifetime, you have so many pages to break down the goals into individual steps.  Check back often to write how you’re doing.
  4. Record Dreams: Sometimes dreams are unbelievably insightful—and other times, they are just crazy images inspired by too much bad television and a questionable glass of wine before bedtime. Writing down what you remember about your dreams can help cement the lessons you might otherwise lose.
  5. Note Quotes: A journal is a great place to write down quotes or sayings and refer to them later for further writing inspiration, a pick-me-up, or sharing with friends and family.
  6. Review Books/Movies/Performances: Write down your opinions about the book you just finished, the movie you just watched, or the performance you just attended. What did you like best? What do you wish was done differently? What was just completely WRONG? Did someone surprise you? You could even include pictures or your ticket stubs as extras!
  7. Remember Moments: Just like a camera, a journal can hold onto moments—fun times with your friends, worldly observations, outlandish ideas—that you will want to mull over again later. Write them down quickly and if you want, revisit that moment later to respond to it, simply reminisce, or flesh out the details.
  8. Marking Birthdays/Anniversaries: How about a special journal you bring out once a year for your birthday or anniversary? You can write down what you did, where you went, who was there, what gifts you gave and received and all of those other details. Important dates come and go too quickly in our lives not to grab onto the details so we can look at them again next year.
  9. Keep Contacts: Use a small, portable journal for writing down the names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses and web sites of the people you network with at parties, work, stores, and other locations. Pull the journal out of a purse, messenger bag, or back pocket and get that contact info before the two of you go in different directions, so that later, when you are at home, you can get in touch. Always jot down a couple of words next to the name to jog your memory of why you wanted to follow up.
  10. Monitor Expenses: Are you number-minded? Wondering how much you spend on eating out or filling up the gas tank? Where does that weekly paycheck keep disappearing to? Write it all down in your journal. If nothing else, in a couple of years, when you look back at it and see what gas prices used to be, you will get a good laugh.

Open up the cover, uncap the pen or sharpen the pencil and fill in that first page. A journal is yours to create—so start writing! What words are ready to go on your page? What moments do you want to capture? Use your journal and go!

Carnival of Pen, Pencil & Paper

6 Mar

Welcome to the March 6, 2012 edition of the Carnival of Pen, Pencil, and Paper! We’re thrilled to host this month’s Carnival and we hope you enjoy the selection!

Notebooks

Nifty Notebook presents Early 1980s “Comp” Pocket Memo Notebooks posted at Notebook Stories, saying, “Some gems from my collection: 1908s spiral notebooks that look like composition books!”

Alex Witte presents (Most of) My Notebook Collection posted at Economy Pens.

Sandra Strait presents Bleedthrumanade in Moleskine & Review of the Moleskine Squared Notebook posted at Life Imitates Doodles, saying, “A review of Moleskine’s Squared notebook showing how it holds up to the alcohol marker.”

Sandra Strait presents New Tangle Pattern Malacca & Review of the Moleskine Volant Journal posted at Life Imitates Doodles, saying, “This could be considered for the art genre as well as notebook because I always do artwork to use in my reviews.”

Sandra Strait presents New tangle pattern Twining & Review of the Rhodia Unlimited Pocket size Notebook posted at Life Imitates Doodles.

@EuroPaper presents The Birth of the Book Letter posted at European Paper Company.

Office Supplies

Charles Chua C K presents All About Living With Life: 10 Office Efficiency Tips posted at All About Living with Life.

Liz Shaw presents You Can’t Make This Stuff Up posted at Liz Andra Shaw, saying, “How the lust for office supplies led one woman into a funny situation.”

Pens

Cheryl from Writer’s Bloc presents STAEDTLER Mars Draft 924 Technical Ballpoint Pen Review posted at Writer’s Bloc Blog.

Okami0731 presents Featured Pen – Waterman 42 Safety posted at Whatever.

Heather presents Pentel EnerGel 0.7mm Black posted at A Penchant for Paper.

Miscellaneous

Tiger Pens presents The Fountain Pen Rest Stop posted at Tiger Pens’ Blog.

Charles Chua C K presents All About Living With Life: Office Feng Shui – 5 Great Tips posted at All About Living with Life.

Clement Dionglay presents Ink Review: J. Herbin Ambre de Birmanie posted at Rants of the Archer.

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Thanks so much for joining us! Use this shortlink to share this post: http://wp.me/p1PnL4-og

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Carnival of pen, pencil and paper using the carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Friday Blogger Tuck-ins

2 Mar

1 –>  Laurie at Plannerisms wrote a strongly worded post regarding the new trend in using Pinterest and why she adamantly is against it (and has requested all of her images to be removed from Pinterest). As more companies and individuals flock to the image-sharing site, she brings up a good conversation regarding privacy and copyright laws. What’s your take on it?

2 –> The Quo Vadis blog has some neat information (and time management tips) from Dr. FG Beltrami, “the founder of Quo Vadis and inventor of the Agenda planner with its one-week-on-two-pages layout” that you will want to read. Here’s Part 1 and Part 2.

3 –> TigerPens has a great post offering other writing instruments if you want a change, but don’t want a fountain pen particularly. Read it here.

4 –> As seen on This is Colossal “Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper.”

5 –> Looking for a penpal? Check out Julie’s blog Penpal of the Week – each week she posts another person looking for a penpal to help people connect!

6 –> Check out some of the pages being created within the Webbies for the Rhodia Journal Swap! Several have been passed to the next person, are you one of them?

7 –>  We love that the Guardian featured an article titled “Why I Love Stationery” by Lucy Mangan. Here is an excerpt:  “The right pen and the right paper brought into conjunction, runs the unspoken thought, cannot help but result in a sudden influx of bold, brilliant and original ideas, the germ of a bestselling novel that will in its turn be inscribed in another, perhaps larger notebook more worthy of the task, in sentences as creamy and beautiful as the pages on which they are written.” We’re just wondering why the image is of post-it notes on the author instead of … stationery, obviously.

8 –> Michael at Orange Crate Art shared this image originally “by the Illinois WPA Art Project for the WPA Statewide Library Project. Stamped March 25, 1941. From the Library of Congress’s online archive American Memory.”  We fell in love with it and just had to share. It’s time to whip out some books!


 

5 Tips for Overcoming Writer’s Block

1 Mar

Writers love to discuss writer’s block. Is it real or is it just fear? Is it a symptom of being creatively drained or of being undisciplined? Regardless of which side of the discussion you side with, there is one truth:  Whether you’re an avid journaler, a dedicated letter writer or a professional writer, we all get stuck once in a while. No matter how hard you try, sometimes those blinking cursors and blank pages stop us in our tracks. Next time you get stuck, try one (or all!) of these five tricks to overcome your block.

Obsess … With a Timer

It’s okay to fret about being stuck. It’s normal and healthy – as long as you don’t let it derail you completely. So spend a few minutes obsessing, but set a timer to keep you focused. Set the timer for nine minutes. Spend that time doing nothing but obsessing. Think about why you’re stuck. Is it the project? Do you have other, perhaps more important, tasks that you should do first? Let your mind wander. When that timer goes off, use one minute to refocus. Take a couple deep breaths, open a new window or flip to a new page, and start writing.

Dig Into Your Past (and Present and Future)

If you just can’t think of anything to write, start with your past. If you’re working on a daily journal entry, try to remember the names of your elementary school teachers and how they made you feel. If you’re struggling with a piece of fiction, start with the worst day you can possibly remember from when you were a child. Describe the people, the smells, the scenery. Apply those same principles to the present (how did I feel this morning during my commute?) and to the future (what is the best thing that could happen to me in the next five years?).

List, List, List

This is my go-to strategy anytime I feel stuck. Start a list. List anything: groceries, your friends’ names from junior high, things you’re grateful for, goals for the year, things you’d buy if you had a bottomless bank account. Get creative with your lists! Try your favorite books in alphabetical order or aim to list 101 of something.

Create Sentence “Starts”

On a sticky note or the back page of your journal, draft a handful of sentence “starts” that you can refer to when you get stuck. Some good options:

  • Nothing makes me happier than …
  • If I could change one thing about my family …
  • If I found a $50 bill on the sidewalk, I would …

Make a list of 10 to 20 that you can refer to whenever you feel blocked. Use it to start a journal entry or a piece of fiction.

Walk Away

This last-resort trick is for when you’ve tried everything but nothing’s working. Stand up, turn around, and walk away. Take your dog around the block. Make a cup of tea. Watch a daytime talk show. Sometimes the pressure can be too great, and when you’re focused on the fact that you’re stuck, it can be really difficult to find a way to get unstuck. Let your smarty-pants subconscious do the work for a while. The important thing here is to stay away from tasks that will keep you away from your work. Pick something short and something mindless (that laundry’s not going to fold itself) so that you don’t divert all your brainpower away from your writing. After a short break, do some stretches, take a couple deep breaths, and then get back to it.

Everyone gets stuck. In any creative project, it’s only normal. The difference between being successful and unsuccessful is to let a little block stop your progress!

Live Your Life in Color: Paper and Color Theory

28 Feb

Have you ever noticed how many restaurants use red? Next time you go out to eat, keep an eye out for how many establishments have red logos or signs, red-hued menus or table linens, and even red décor. It’s no coincidence: Psychologists have long recognized that red stimulates appetite.

Marketers and social scientists study colors and how they affect people across industries. The effects of each color have been studied and interpreted and are used as a common, subconscious way to sway a consumer. However, it’s not just for industry professionals; you can leverage the benefits of color theory, too!

Be Productive (or at least make others think you’re productive)

Choose blue. As you go about your workday, notice how many corporations use blue in their logos and on their websites. Most shades of blue convey trust and honesty. Light blue presents calm and focus, while darker shades of blue exude power – think of a navy suit. Consider painting your office your favorite shade of blue or, if you don’t get to choose your paint colors, add in blue accents with photos, desk accessories, or even a light blue journal (like the Leuchtturm1917 Pocket Ruled Journal).

Calm Those Shaky Nerves

Moleskine Volant Mini Ruled Notebook (Set of 2) (2.5 x 4) on EuropeanPaper.com

Confrontations are part of business life. No one likes to deal with tense, stressful, or ugly meetings, but when you must, settle your nerves by taking minutes in a lavender Moleskine notebook. Lavender is known to be a calming color. You’ll help yourself feel a little more settled – and, who knows? It may rub off on your colleagues! And, since those Moleskine sets come with both lavender and purple, use the purple when you want to convey wisdom. Deeper purples, long considered royal colors, convey dignity, wealth, and success.

Snap Out of a Creative Funk

Whatever you do, skip brown! Brown has a reputation for being boring and just too practical. Instead, focus on bright cover colors. While a bright red could do the trick, your best bet might be a sunny yellow, which will help give you energy. To up your creative spark, take yellow Rite in Rain notebook outdoors to gather inspiration! (Read more about Rite in the Rain on our blog here.)

Convey Your Excitement

Demonstrate your enthusiasm for a new project or generate a little excitement with orange. Brighter orange shows a youthful, peppier optimism, while a darker-hued orange shows warmth. The Rhodia collection seems tailor-made for displaying bright, cheerful, excitement! Not an orange person? Consider a simple orange pencil from Rhodia instead of bigger splashes of the color.

Clairefontaine Basics Large Spiralbound Notebook With Pockets (6 x 8.25) on EuropeanPaper.com

Show Eco-Prowess

Convey to your colleagues that you are an all-natural, environmentally-conscious consumer with a green notebook. The color green evokes a down-to-earth vibe and symbolizes growth. However, green also is considered the color of envy and lack of experience – so choose a shade or hue that is found in nature, like muted tones, olive greens, or rich, leafy shades.

Control the Boardroom

In color theory, black is a neutral. Slick black is associated with power, elegance, and formality. Run meetings with a hardcover, black Moleskine to convey sophistication. Black also can be used to display a modern or traditional sensibility – so leverage black to enhance your natural style.

In the end, though, whether you select colors to help adjust your own mood or to subtly sway those around you, make sure you choose ones you like as well! If pink makes you happy, pick pink!

Friday Blogger Tuck-ins

24 Feb

1 –>  A bit of neat history this week from Annie at Scribbling Glue about zip codes: The Life and Times of Mr. Zip (a.k.a. Zone Improvement Plan).

2 –> Over at the Good Pens blog, Seth interviews the pen guys from Baltz Fine Writing.

3 –> Misty, a.k.a. The Pen Thief, made some great points regarding whether or not the Post Office should cut Saturday’s service. It is a must-read for all snail mailers, mail artists, and writers alike.

4 –> This is Colossal shared the Alphabet Typography (pictured below) created by Yale graduates Caspar Lam and YuJune Park. “Alphabet Topography is a physical examination of letterforms as it relates to usage frequency.”

See more of the project by clicking the image.

5 –> Laurie at Plannerisms gives some tips on how to create your own planner layout within a regular notebook.

6 –> FPGeeks went above and beyond at the 2012 LA Pen Show and photographed some lovely pens, plus they’ve got a couple of videos of the show you should check out too. Here is their Friday Recap, Saturday Recap, and Video Highlights.

7 –>  We thought you’d get a kick out of Mary Katrantzou‘s latest fashion show for Fall 2012 where she uses images of pencils, typewriters, circular telephone dials, and more. (Originally seen on Honestly WTF blog.)

Click the image to see more images on Honestly WTF's blog.

8 –> Blackwing wrote up a phenomenal post tracking the history of their Blackwing 602 pencil (h/t MLeddy at Orange Crate Art).


 

A Guide to Recycled Paper

23 Feb

There was a time when recycled paper came in two hues: washed-out gray and off-yellow. Now, recycled paper is available in a rainbow of colors, a range of materials, and even with custom printing options. But not all recycled paper is created equal!

Buying recycled paper reduces the amount of waste ending up in the landfill. It also saves energy – recycled paper uses much less energy to produce – and recycling causes less air and water pollution than manufacturing “virgin” paper. However, make sure you’re getting the biggest environmentally friendly bang for your buck. Keep in mind a few recycled paper definitions that will help you choose the most eco-friendly option whether you’re buying journals, stationery, or even office supplies!

Post-Consumer Waste vs. Pre-Consumer Waste

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), recycled paper must be made from at least 30% post-consumer waste. That means that 30% has been used by a consumer, turned into a recycling program, and then reused to make new paper. Pre-consumer waste, on the other hand, uses scraps left over from the paper manufacturing process. While it’s good to use up that waste, it’s even better to eliminate it from the paper production process altogether, which means buying paper with the highest post-consumer waste content that you can find. For example, the Mudlark notecards boast 80% post-consumer waste, a very eco-friendly choice for writing that thank you note!

Recycled Content

You might find paper products labeled with a “recycled content” or “contains recycled content” claim. In these cases, the product has less than 30% post-consumer waste or contains only pre-consumer waste. While it’s great to buy products that use any amount of recycled content, these paper options are on the low end of the eco-friendly paper scale.

Chlorine Free

You might see a number of chlorine-related claims on paper products. The bottom line: The chlorine bleaching process produces tons of toxins that may disrupt our immune systems. If you’re looking for top-shelf eco-friendly paper products, you want to find the “100% chlorine free” claim, which means the virgin paper wasn’t bleached with chlorine at any point, or – even better – the “processed chlorine free” claim, which indicates that the recycled content wasn’t bleached with chlorine.

Acid Free

Acid-free paper production neutralizes the acids that occur in wood pulp to create longer-lasting paper that won’t yellow over time. The paper itself can last from 500 to 1,000 years, which has made it appealing to archivists and scrapbookers, but that long-lasting feature has made it a subject of numerous eco-debates. However, the process to make the paper is significantly more environmentally friendly than the process to produce standard paper. So don’t choose paper simply because it’s acid free; choose a paper that is environmentally responsible in some other way and is acid-free.

Tree-Free Fiber

A tree-free fiber claim on a paper product means that material was derived from a source other than trees. These tree-free options are usually a little more expensive but provide you with the most sustainable paper option. Tree-free fibers include animal poop, hemp, textile scraps, sugar cane husks, and more. Check out the Cherry Blossoms Large Lokta Journal or the Poo Poo Paper Elephant Silhouette Journal for tree-free fiber options.

Sustainable Certifications

The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification schemes (PEFC) are both non-profit, non-governmental organizations that promote responsible forest management. Seals from these organizations indicate that paper has been approved in their certification processes. As is the case whenever multiple organizations provide the same function, there is significant debate over which certification is better; in North America, it seems the preference is for the FSC seal.

Finally, to score more eco-friendly points, look for recycled paper that is printed with soy-based ink. Traditional ink is petroleum-based, so soy is a gentler alternative.


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